I can’t tell from your post what things you’ve NOT done, but I imagine you’ve done quite a bit of Nick’s list. As a caveat to others who may be reading this as a small business owner, I’d say that because brand is so integrated in everything you do, if you DON’T pay attention to the brand you WON’T see the sales. In other words, you can’t afford to ignore the brand. For start-ups, that means planning for non-revenue generating work – brand development – before you start seeing sales. We call those investments “table stakes” because it’s what you have to do just to establish your brand, even before the first sale is made. If we could get sales without managing the brand, there’d be no reason to manage the brand.
A logo in the hands of a professional CAN increase sales. I have on many occasions had customers who previously had amateur logos to start their businesses, now express delight that the new image positioned them in a better light with prospects. And this resulted in more business because of the perception that they were larger players in their market.

A buyer persona is simply a description of the person you’re trying to reach. You might have several. Give the persona a name. Write out the features of that person (“Sally has a master’s degree and likes buying organic food”) to illustrate her and get to know her. Then, when you do your marketing, keep that “person” in mind and address your messaging to her specifically.

A good brand will have no trouble drumming up referral business. Strong branding generally means there is a positive impression of the company amongst consumers, and they are likely to do business with you because of the familiarity and assumed dependability of using a name they can trust. Once a brand has been well-established, word of mouth will be the company’s best and most effective advertising technique.


Market pioneers are known to often open a new market to consumers based off a major innovation.[93] They emphasise these product developments, and in a significant number of cases, studies have shown that early entrants – or pioneers – into a market have serious market-share advantages above all those who enter later.[94] Pioneers have the first-mover advantage, and in order to have this advantage, business’ must ensure they have at least one or more of three primary sources: Technological Leadership, Preemption of Assets or Buyer Switching Costs.[92] Technological Leadership means gaining an advantage through either Research and Development or the “learning curve”.[92] This lets a business use the research and development stage as a key point of selling due to primary research of a new or developed product. Preemption of Assets can help gain an advantage through acquiring scarce assets within a certain market, allowing the first-mover to be able to have control of existing assets rather than those that are created through new technology.[92] Thus allowing pre-existing information to be used and a lower risk when first entering a new market. By being a first entrant, it is easy to avoid higher switching costs compared to later entrants. For example, those who enter later would have to invest more expenditure in order to encourage customers away from early entrants.[92] However, while Market Pioneers may have the “highest probability of engaging in product development”[95] and lower switching costs, to have the first-mover advantage, it can be more expensive due to product innovation being more costly than product imitation. It has been found that while Pioneers in both consumer goods and industrial markets have gained “significant sales advantages”,[96] they incur larger disadvantages cost-wise.
This type of market strategy is effective when you want to build a positive relationship with your prospect audience without spending too much money. This includes marketing strategies which attract your customers to your business like a magnet. You can make your presence visible on social media use an email list to share free content. As people have become blind to television advertisement these days. This type of marketing strategy will surely get their attention.
A buyer persona is simply a description of the person you’re trying to reach. You might have several. Give the persona a name. Write out the features of that person (“Sally has a master’s degree and likes buying organic food”) to illustrate her and get to know her. Then, when you do your marketing, keep that “person” in mind and address your messaging to her specifically.
The rise of social media platforms has increased the importance of social media marketing, including connecting with customers on social media by persuading them to follow your business, partnering with social media influencers through product placement or paid sponsorships, and paying for advertising on platforms like Facebook or Instagram. The types of advertising that you choose will depend on your budget, type of business, and the preferences of your ideal customers.
This brand kit is a pinnacle of low-maintenance and high-effectiveness. The use of bold, colours, large type and minimal elements makes this design easy to navigate, read and customise. Pair the elegant typographic titles with some visually captivating and coolly filtered images for a super quick, simple and tailored design, perfect for anyone looking for an easy-to-use but classical and sophisticated template!
Mr. Rice… I found these “tips” on branding to really miss the whole point of branding. It has to do with differentiating your company/product/service in a positive and unique way, and it begins with your strategy, not tactics. Positioning your offering within your competing category through significant strategies (not logo color or even its cost) having to do with company values, mission and culture, an understanding of customer and prospect values, needs and triggers, knowing your competitor’s positioning and corporat strategies are all significant inputs to the ultimate brand. Your tip number five sort of addresses this, but is really simplistic. I don’t care how small a company is, a strategic foundation for branding is first and most important. I’m blogging a series of post called Branding Basics at http://www.thebrandingblog.com. I’ve just posted my sixth blog in the series and have just given readers permission to begin the “creative” process by writing their brand’s “story”: all this before we ever address the elements of name, logo and teglines, never mind media. If you check it out, I’d welcome your comments.
Key Ideas: Each business is unique and that there can be no formula for achieving competitive advantage; firms should adopt a flexible planning and review process that aims to cope with strategic surprises and rapidly developing threats; management's focus is on how to deliver superior customer value; highlights the key role of marketing as the link between customers and the organisation. The Difference Between Digital Marketing and Traditional Advertising
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