Those who follow after the Close Followers are known as the Late Entrants. While being a Late Entrant can seem very daunting, there are some perks to being a latecomer. For example, Late Entrants have the ability to learn from those who are already in the market or have previously entered.[98] Late Followers have the advantage of learning from their early competitors and improving the benefits or reducing the total costs. This allows them to create a strategy that could essentially mean gaining market share and most importantly, staying in the market. In addition to this, markets evolve, leading to consumers wanting improvements and advancements on products.[99] Late Followers have the advantage of catching the shifts in customer needs and wants towards the products.[92] When bearing in mind customer preference, customer value has a significant influence. Customer value means taking into account the investment of customers as well as the brand or product.[100] It is created through the “perceptions of benefits” and the “total cost of ownership”.[100] On the other hand, if the needs and wants of consumers have only slightly altered, Late Followers could have a cost advantage over early entrants due to the use of product imitation.[95] However, if a business is switching markets, this could take the cost advantage away due to the expense of changing markets for the business. Late Entry into a market does not necessarily mean there is a disadvantage when it comes to market share, it depends on how the marketing mix is adopted and the performance of the business.[101] If the marketing mix is not used correctly – despite the entrant time – the business will gain little to no advantages, potentially missing out on a significant opportunity.
Mr. Rice… I found these “tips” on branding to really miss the whole point of branding. It has to do with differentiating your company/product/service in a positive and unique way, and it begins with your strategy, not tactics. Positioning your offering within your competing category through significant strategies (not logo color or even its cost) having to do with company values, mission and culture, an understanding of customer and prospect values, needs and triggers, knowing your competitor’s positioning and corporat strategies are all significant inputs to the ultimate brand. Your tip number five sort of addresses this, but is really simplistic. I don’t care how small a company is, a strategic foundation for branding is first and most important. I’m blogging a series of post called Branding Basics at http://www.thebrandingblog.com. I’ve just posted my sixth blog in the series and have just given readers permission to begin the “creative” process by writing their brand’s “story”: all this before we ever address the elements of name, logo and teglines, never mind media. If you check it out, I’d welcome your comments.
For instance, you produce equipment of machines, you are doing a business-to-business space. It requires a different approach than business-to-consumer marketing because there several more steps involved in it. You need to find out the decision makers and find out ways to persuade them to business with you. to do this, you need to build a relationship with them by providing superlative services.
I’m not sure if a logo needs to be emotive. Most of the big brand logos that I can think of are not (Nike, Starbucks, McDonalds, GE, IBM, Adobe, GM, VW, etc…). There are personal emotions associated with each brand built from conversations with friends, company reps, etc… Those emotions can vary widely among groups. But if you were just exposed to their logo without any previous brand perception, their logo wouldn’t elicit an emotional response. I’d love to hear your take.
By using some more muted and desaturated filters on your images, just as this template encourages, you can create a gentler, less garish effect, perfect for any brand that wants to appear more ‘down to earth’ and authentic. Also, let this template kern your type loosely to give it a bit more space to breathe, creating an overall sophisticated and clean look for your design. In short, this template kit is just perfect for any brands that are a little dreamy, natural or rustic.
Key Ideas: Each business is unique and that there can be no formula for achieving competitive advantage; firms should adopt a flexible planning and review process that aims to cope with strategic surprises and rapidly developing threats; management's focus is on how to deliver superior customer value; highlights the key role of marketing as the link between customers and the organisation.
Creating high contrast designs was never easier thanks to this template. Use simple but sharp lines and a striking colour palette to grab attention right away, and then hold that attention with some sleek typefaces to add an element of sophistication to your message. This template is perfect for any professional or corporate brands looking to get a little bit simpler and a whole lot sharper.
Why is that so important? For Zappos, making excellent customer service the cornerstone of its brand actually saved money on marketing and advertising. That’s because it created word-of-mouth among existing and potential customers, which is what we call earned media -- the recognition that your brand has earned, not paid for, from people talking about something remarkable you did. (Psst -- U.S. businesses, as a whole, lose about $41 billion dollars each year because of bad customer service.)

Proper branding is critical to your long term success. A lot of people think of branding as logo development. But in reality, branding is managing the thoughts and feelings of your customers to ensure that you are what they desire. If your desired brand image isn’t what’s in the minds of your target audience, you’ve got to figure out where the gaps are and how to address them. And fixing those issues is hard work because the old adage still rings true – the customer is always right. What Is Digital Marketing? | Digital Marketing Tutorial For Beginners | Edureka
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